Build a Great New Team through Great Leadership – Part 1

A Case – You are establishing a unique Professional Services firm out of Australia – you have the idea, the brand and are putting together a team of talented, focussed individuals with great potential.

What strategies and skills must you employ to make the most of this potential? What is the best way to lead a crop of great people? Read the rest of this entry »

Build a Great New Team through Great Leadership – Part 2

In Part 1 as a Case – We are establishing a unique Professional Services firm out of Australia – you have the idea, the brand and are putting together a team of talented, focussed individuals with great potential.

What strategies and skills must you employ to make the most of this potential? What is the best way to lead a crop of great people?

Having achieved that then what are:

Your 12 Key Cornerstones of a sustainable dynamic Start-up

Read the rest of this entry »

Are you Mentoring your People for Leadership? – Part 1

We all need a mentor? Well – maybe – not too sure is often the answer!

Since we at CMG implemented our Leadership Enhancement ‘Questionnaire’ some time back for our Senior Executive clients, one area constantly hits the ‘Top 10 of the Charts’ – and that is developing your Team members.

Accordingly this guide has been developed to assist you in this area – and if executed appropriately will result in a significant dent in CMG’s revenue stream to say the least!

But that is good is it not – as developing our clients to become better ‘Leaders’ is to a greater extent our Mission. Hence this outline. Read the rest of this entry »

Are you Mentoring your People for Leadership? – Part 2

No matter how successful a mentoring session feels while it’s underway, if it doesn’t lead to change after it’s over, it hasn’t been effective. Unfortunately, too many managers don’t adequately follow through and thereby squander the important time they’ve invested in mentoring. You can make the process more effective by adopting these practices after every session.

Use this list of tips and questions to help you track the progress of everyone you’re mentoring. It will help you offer meaningful support in follow-up meetings, as well as in between meetings. Read the rest of this entry »

Management is definitely not Leadership

Many conversations I have had with clients and professional friends regarding – say world events, including the Australian political landscape quickly veer, as these things often do, into a discussion about how individuals can keep large, complex, unwieldy organizations operating reliably and efficiently.

That’s not leadership, I explain. That’s management — and the two are radically different. Read the rest of this entry »

Take charge of your Career

Trying to figure out where you want your career to go – and get a job that’ll take you there?

That’s no easy task in a fiercely competitive market. How do you clearly and convincingly define what you’ve got to offer to an organization?

And how do you dig up realistic opportunities that match your skills and passions?

Even if you’ve discovered exciting possibilities, you may face other obstacles: Perhaps you’re finding it difficult to compete with more-seasoned professionals. Or maybe you’re struggling to show a logical progression in your job history because you’ve hopped around.

With challenges like these, it can be hard to get any job at all, let alone something that’s satisfying, stable and a good fit. But you can find and land the right job for you, even in a tough economy, with experienced guidance – and commitment from you.

Success begins with knowing exactly where you want your career to take you and then creating an actionable plan to get you there. My career guidance will help you explore your options and decide the most rewarding career path given your experience, skills and passion. Read the rest of this entry »

Why so many Leadership Programs fail

The Difference – what we know about Leadership and what we do as Leaders

The topic in the Executive Committee meeting I was involved with turned to a difficult area for all.

No one had addressed that issue – the topic seemed untouchable.

This time looked to be no different. When the key Executive said he was on top of things, no one challenged him. I looked around the room at the silent senior leadership of the firm, all of whom had privately complained to me about his performance in recent weeks. I suggested we take a 15-minute break.

Every one of these leaders was smart, knowledgeable and capable. They’d all read innumerable books on leadership, taken leadership skills assessments and attended multiple training programs — including executive leadership programs at top business schools. They knew as much as anyone about leadership.

So why weren’t they leading?

The answer is deceptively simple:

There is a massive difference between what we know about leadership and what we do as leaders. Read the rest of this entry »

Hard and Soft Barriers to Effective Communication – and Collaboration – to the Benefit of the Family Business Client

This is intended as a thought-provoking piece underscoring that family business consulting is an exciting, demanding and very complex field. It is practically impossible for one professional to possess the requisite skills and knowledge to perform all of the functions necessary to address the problems that family firms face. This creates the need for cross-disciplinary collaboration, which is something FFI (Family Firm Institute – USA) and FBA (Family Business Australia) have made great strides in promoting. However, sometimes there are obstacles in realizing collaboration because of limitations in how we see others and ourselves. This piece should challenge you to reconsider the language used to describe colleagues in a way that is more nuanced and respectful of what everyone has to offer. Read the rest of this entry »

Hard and Soft Barriers to Effective Communication – and Collaboration – for the senior Executive Client and key Stakeholder Clients

This is intended as a thought-provoking piece underscoring that executive mentoring is an exciting, demanding and very complex field – certainly for all those currently “jumping on the band wagon” with little or no relevant experience. It is practically impossible for one professional to possess the requisite skills and knowledge to perform all of the functions necessary to address the challenges that firms face. This creates the need for cross-disciplinary collaboration, which is something AICD and AIM are still grappling with – while, for example, top-tier Law and Accounting firms are ignoring – at least to my experience! However, sometimes there are obstacles in realizing collaboration because of limitations in how we see others and ourselves. This piece should challenge you to reconsider the language used to describe colleagues in a way that is more nuanced and respectful of what everyone has to offer.

Understanding and respecting what we all do is critical to our working together and learning from each other.  Using shorthand phrases or jargon that tries to encapsulate in a word (“hard”, “soft”, “process” or “content”) a profoundly complex distinction simply gets in the way of effective understanding and collaboration. Read the rest of this entry »

A Mentor can really give you the Edge

It can be tough and lonely at the top, so it pays to have an experienced person to point the way

When Peter James moved from London to Australia, he was surprised at the huge difference between the business environments in the two countries.

James, chief executive of a large professional Industry body, said: “You would think that moving from the UK to Australia would be pretty similar, with the English language, English legal system and so on in common. However, there is a fundamentally different approach here and I needed advice to help me cope.”

In the southern hemisphere decisions were made much more quickly, he said. “In Australia, if you have 80% of the facts you will take the risk and move forward. In the UK there’s more a tendency to keep talking through the issue to get more than 90% or 100%. I was not prepared to push on much faster.

“By moving halfway round the world my old network of support was no longer as valuable because they didn’t understand the new situation. I needed someone I could talk to who understood what was happening in Australia.” Read the rest of this entry »